iPhone 5

iPhone 5All the salacious headlines are (mostly) true — as of Saturday, you can’t unlock a carrier-subsidized smartphone on your own before the contract associated with it runs out without technically running afoul of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Granted, I’d wager that the number of people who faithfully stick to their multi-year wireless contracts far exceeds the number of people who would unlock their phones and bail, but this is still a damned lousy turn of events for all you proponents of phone freedom out there (myself included). But how did this actually happen? To more clearly understand the change that went into effect, we have to flash back to the heady days of 2010. In late July of that year, the Electronic Frontier Foundation announced on its blog that it had won three big exemptions to the DMCA.

Read the full story at TechCrunch.

Shelly Palmer

Shelly Palmer is Managing Partner at Palmer Advanced Media, a technology-focused strategic advisory practice that helps Fortune 500 companies and growth-stage companies with digital strategy, data science, marketing, branding, and business development. He is Fox 5 New York's on-air tech and digital media expert and a regular commentator on CNBC and CNN. @shellypalmer or visit shellypalmer.com.

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"It’s Now Illegal to Unlock Your Phone; What Does This Mean?" by @ShellyPalmer