Shelly Palmer Radio Report – January 8, 2014

You know that Facebook status you typed up, thought about, then realized wasn’t something you wanted to share with the world? Facebook has the ability to keep track of it, even though you never shared it. The code in your browser that powers Facebook knows what you typed, meaning the stuff you intentionally chose NOT to share isn’t entirely private. This type of technology isn’t unique to Facebook. Gmail automatically saves emails as you type them and stores them in your Drafts folder. Even if you close your browser, you can usually find the email you were typing. That’s very similar to what Facebook is doing – except Google is saving your messages to help you, while Facebook is doing it with no benefit to you. Facebook calls these unposted thoughts “self-censorship” and feels the interaction is covered by its privacy policy. Facebook isn’t currently collecting your self-censored posts – though it very easily could – so the next time you even think to type something into Facebook, think again.

Author:

Shelly Palmer

Shelly Palmer is Fox 5 New York's On-air Tech Expert (WNYW-TV) and the host of Fox Television's monthly show Shelly Palmer Digital Living. He also hosts United Stations Radio Network's, Shelly Palmer Digital Living Daily, a daily syndicated radio report that features insightful commentary and a unique insiders take on the biggest stories in technology, media, and entertainment. He is Managing Director of Advanced Media Ventures Group, LLC an industry-leading advisory and business development firm and a member of the Executive Committee of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (the organization that bestows the coveted Emmy® Awards).