Shelly Palmer Radio Report – November 11, 2013

Would you let Motorola tattoo a smartphone microphone onto your throat? If a new patent filed by the company is any indication, that’s exactly what Motorola plans to do. The microphone would have a transceiver and a power supply, and would capture vibrations directly from your larynx to cut out background noise. The device would be able to communicate with your phone through Bluetooth, NFC or some other wireless protocol, just like traditional headsets do already. Motorola has been known to bend the definition of the word “tattoo,” and has used the term to apply to thin, pliable strips that adhere to your body and are replaced on a weekly basis. The technology isn’t totally crazy, though, and is somewhat similar to bone-inductive transducers, which let you hear sounds by vibrating the bones in your head. It seems like a steep – and permanent – price to pay to cut out some noisy distractions, over something like a high-end Bluetooth headset, but at least you can’t misplace the tattoo!

About Shelly Palmer

Shelly Palmer is the Professor of Advanced Media in Residence at Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, co-founder of Metacademy, and the CEO of The Palmer Group, a consulting practice that helps Fortune 500 companies with technology, media and marketing. Named LinkedIn’s “Top Voice in Technology,” he covers tech and business for Good Day New York, is a regular commentator on CNN and CNBC and writes a popular daily business blog. He’s the Co-Host of the award-winning podcast Techstream with Shelly Palmer & Seth Everett and his latest book, Blockchain - Cryptocurrency, NFTs & Smart Contracts: An executive guide to the world of decentralized finance, is an Amazon #1 Bestseller. Follow @shellypalmer or visit shellypalmer.com.

Tags

Categories

PreviousFive Ready-to-Use Templates for Tricky Job Search Emails NextReport: Google Play May Be Coming to BlackBerry

Get Briefed Every Day!

Subscribe to my daily newsletter featuring current events and the top stories in technology, media, and marketing.

Subscribe