Shelly Palmer Radio Report – January 8, 2014

You know that Facebook status you typed up, thought about, then realized wasn’t something you wanted to share with the world? Facebook has the ability to keep track of it, even though you never shared it. The code in your browser that powers Facebook knows what you typed, meaning the stuff you intentionally chose NOT to share isn’t entirely private. This type of technology isn’t unique to Facebook. Gmail automatically saves emails as you type them and stores them in your Drafts folder. Even if you close your browser, you can usually find the email you were typing. That’s very similar to what Facebook is doing – except Google is saving your messages to help you, while Facebook is doing it with no benefit to you. Facebook calls these unposted thoughts “self-censorship” and feels the interaction is covered by its privacy policy. Facebook isn’t currently collecting your self-censored posts – though it very easily could – so the next time you even think to type something into Facebook, think again.

About Shelly Palmer

Shelly Palmer is the Professor of Advanced Media in Residence at Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, co-founder of Metacademy, and the CEO of The Palmer Group, a consulting practice that helps Fortune 500 companies with technology, media and marketing. Named LinkedIn’s “Top Voice in Technology,” he covers tech and business for Good Day New York, is a regular commentator on CNN and CNBC and writes a popular daily business blog. He’s the Co-Host of the award-winning podcast Techstream with Shelly Palmer & Seth Everett and his latest book, Blockchain - Cryptocurrency, NFTs & Smart Contracts: An executive guide to the world of decentralized finance, is an Amazon #1 Bestseller. Follow @shellypalmer or visit shellypalmer.com.

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